Platter

Platter


From Henry Whitfield State Museum

Date manufactured/created
Description
This platter was made in London in the mid-1700s. Pewter was a symbol of gentility in colonial homes because it showed that the owner could afford more than simple woodenware. Pewter is a metal alloy composed mainly of tin. Varying percentages of other metals like copper, antimony, bismuth, and lead can be added to give strength and durability to the tin. Sometimes, especially in American pewter, the lead content was fairly high, and people could get lead poisoning from ingesting food and drink that had absorbed lead from tableware.
Places
London
Dimensions
, 12.25 in Diameter
Measurement Notes: Outer raised rim - 1-1/2" wide
Measurement Types: Item (Overall)
Credit Line
Gift of Mrs. Samuel Hull of Guilford in 1902
Accession/ID number
HW1902.187